Wednesday, April 08, 2009

A Saltire in 2009


The Saltire is Scotland's national flag which is the oldest flag in Europe and the Commonwealth, and it has its origins in a battle fought in East Lothian in the Dark Ages. Its believed that the battle took place in 832AD. An army of Picts under the High King of Alba, and aided by a contingent of Scots had been on a raid into Lothian and were being pursued by a larger force of Angles and Saxons under one Athelstan. The Scots were caught and stood to face their pursuers in the area of Markle, near East Linton, north of the modern village of Athelstaneford. Fearing the outcome of the encounter, the Scots' King led prayers for deliverance, and was rewarded by seeing a cloud formation of a white saltire (the diagonal cross on which St Andrew had been martyred) against a blue sky. The king vowed that if, with the saint's help, he gained the victory, then Andrew would thereafter be the patron saint of Scotland. The Scots did win, and the Saltire became the flag of Scotland.

This photograph was taken at 8.15 pm this evening looking towards East Lothian, near Athelstanesford. History does repeat itself. . .

5 comments:

Richard Thomson said...

Great picture!

bigrab said...

This is fantastic Richard. I have seen similar in the skies around here as we are near the flight paths for Glasgow. Alas I've never had a camera to capture it.

Well done!

Colin Campbell said...

Great for Kkywatch Friday. Thanks for the history lesson. I had no idea.

CherryPie said...

That is a fantastic photo :-)

Birthday Girl said...

That's fab, Richard. Will you be adding postcards to your publishing empire? It would make a good one.